ARTS/ENTERTAINMENT

‘Spirit of Indiana’: A New Campus Sculpture

From meticulous gardens to architectural gems, Indiana University is known for its picturesque campus. Outdoor statues and sculptures help accentuate that beauty, but IU philanthropist Pat Miller noticed that the artistic touches stopped north of 17th Street as visitors approached the athletics complex.

Pacifica Quartet Wins Another Grammy

At the 2021 Grammy Awards, Indiana University’s quartet-in-residence, The Pacifica Quartet, was awarded Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance for its album Contemporary Voices.

Raymond Fleischmann: B-town’s New Novelist

Raymond Fleischmann, director of advancement communications at the Indiana University College of Arts and Sciences, published his debut novel, How Quickly She Disappears (Berkley Books), in January 2020.

April Strawn: Teen Book Illustrator

Late in the process of publishing The Chill, author Michael Koryta pitched the idea of including pictures in the novel to his editor. And he knew exactly who he wanted to draw them.

Review: ‘The Way of Imagination’

“How can we keep from crying out in wonder and praise?” asks Scott Russell Sanders in one of the alternately exultant and grieving essays contained in his newest collection, The Way of Imagination.

REVIEW: ‘Kitchen Think’

Like Nancy Hiller’s well-crafted cabinetry, her newest book, ‘Kitchen Think’ (Lost Art Press), is both useful and beautiful.

Power Plant Collective Shows Art by Marginalized Artists

In a small basement on Bloomington’s Near West Side, a group of 20-somethings has created a gallery where aspiring artists can gather. It’s a space where they can display their work and showcase talents that might otherwise remain unknown.

Brown County Music Center Brings Big Names to Nashville

After a 2009 arson fire destroyed the Little Nashville Opry, an entertainment venue that had served Brown County for more than 30 years, the community felt the loss. Things took a bright turn when the Brown County Music Center opened in August 2019 to a sold-out Vince Gill concert.

Wylie House Exhibit Portrays Marginalized, Silenced Hoosiers

The written records and visual art we share as historical representations of our collective past depict, more often than not, only one point of view. Those who weren’t in positions of power—who didn’t have a voice—are frequently forgotten or simply overlooked.

‘‘Lock Ness!’ and Other Tales of Nessie the Scottie’

For all the joy they bring, it’s a sad truth that pets’ lives are much shorter than our own. In “Lock Ness!” and Other Tales of Nessie the Scottie (BookLocker, 2019), Bloomington resident and Bloom contributor Lee Ann Sandweiss explores the loss of her own pet and offers a guiding hand for those experiencing similar grief.

Review: ‘Author in Chief’

Just before President’s Day, Bloom caught up with Bloomington resident Craig Fehrman as he set out on a national book tour for ‘Author in Chief’.

King Bee & The Stingers: Blues Band on the Rise

By day, Mark Menefee, 60, is the Indiana University director of utilities. By night, he’s the black- and-yellow-clad harmonica player “King Bee” of the blues band King Bee and The Stingers.

New Cardinal Initiative Works to Increase Diversity of Plays

In an ongoing effort to be more inclusive, welcoming, and representative of the Bloomington community, Cardinal Stage has introduced the Diversity and Inclusion Initiative. The program is part of Cardinal’s five-year plan that was established in 2018.

Bloomington Symphony Orchestra Celebrates 50 Years Making Music

In 1969, when Geoffrey Simon and Tamás Ungár were students at the Indiana University School of Music, they noticed a lack of performance opportunities for musicians in Bloomington and set out to establish a community orchestra. While Simon actively recruited musicians, Ungár managed behind-the-scenes operations. The result was the Bloomington Symphony Orchestra (BSO).

Eskenazi Museum Acquires The Jeffrey Wolin Collection

Photographer Jeffrey Wolin has spent a lifetime capturing the tragedy, grit, and beauty of the human experience, and his photographs are displayed in museums and galleries worldwide. Now, the Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art at Indiana University has acquired Wolin’s archives—and they contain more than just his previously exhibited and published works.

Cardinal Stage Presents ‘The Roommate’: A Comedy About Two Women Over 50

Film and theater roles for women over 50 have traditionally stayed in a narrow lane—one filled with maternal or spinster archetypes. The Roommate, penned by playwright Jen Silverman, is a dark comedy that aims to break that mold. “Older women are often depicted in a way that belies the truth,” says Indianapolis-based actor Constance Macy. “They aren’t the 50-something women I know.”

B-town Music Expo Is Back February 8

The Bloomington Music Expo—part record and music-memorabilia show, part art and music festival— will be held Saturday, February 8, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Monroe Convention Center. The event, now in its second year, came from the mind of Mike McAfee, executive director of Visit Bloomington.

Documentary on IU’s Henry Glassie Premieres at Toronto Film Festival

The documentary film Henry Glassie: Field Work opens with a series of vignettes of Brazilian sculptors creating traditional sacred art. Not until 30 minutes into the film does Glassie, an internationally renowned folklorist and Indiana University professor emeritus, make an appearance.

Local Drummer Is Living the Dream

Local drummer Luke Narey has long been a fan of alternative metal band 10 Years. “I would blast their music while driving to and from [Edgewood] high school, but never would have imagined I’d have a chance to be part of the band one day,” Narey says.

Steve Dawson: An Unlikely Artist

As a mechanical engineering graduate of Purdue University and president of local mechanical contracting and service firm Harrell-Fish Inc., Steve Dawson might seem an unlikely artist.

New Books from IU Press: ‘Pilgrims of Woodstock’

It’s been 50 years since the Woodstock Music & Art Fair brought 400,000 people together on Max Yasgur’s dairy farm in Bethel, New York. A new book from IU Press, Pilgrims of Woodstock, celebrates the festival’s anniversary by gathering previously unpublished photographs along with the reminiscences of audience members.

The Blues Jam Is Back at Port Hole & Bear’s Place

Joel Kohen has been passionate about the Bloomington music scene since his days as an undergraduate at Indiana University, but he went from enthusiast to proprietor when he and his wife, Deana, bought the Port Hole Inn in January 2017.

Salaam Has Found Its ‘Perfect Balance’

Although Salaam has been together a quarter of a century, founder Dena El Saffar says that only recently has the Middle Eastern quartet hit upon a certain balance that had been quietly simmering for nearly a decade. With patience, practice, and the space to make intuitive music, she says the group feels it has achieved the ideal blend of cultural sounds.

Pictura Gallery: A Nonprofit Supporting Arts Education

David and Martha Moore say they do not have time for stuffy, pretentious art spaces. Once, while in Seattle, they visited an art gallery with a plastic model of a massive, red T. rex on display. David recalls his disappointment seeing a “Don’t Touch” sign juxtaposed with several children running around the model, dying to play with it. “Plastic dinosaurs are meant to be played with,” he says. “How do you not touch a huge, plastic dinosaur?”

Krista Detor’s Annual Holiday Show at FAR Center Dec. 13

Once again, Bloomington-based singer-songwriter Krista Detor will be staying close to home for the holidays, performing an annual show to benefit a local nonprofit organization. “It’s my way of giving back to the community and, at this point, it feels like a tradition, although it’s always a little bit different,” says the internationally acclaimed performer.

Check Out a Zine or Learn to Make One at the Public Library

When local nonprofit bookstore Boxcar Books closed in 2017, the Monroe County Public Library (MCPL) was the recipient of more than 300 zines, increasing its collection to nearly 600 of the small-circulation magazines that are typically self-published and frequently photocopied.

IU’s Eskenazi Art Museum Reopening on November 7

After being closed for renovations since May 2017, the Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art at Indiana University will reopen on November 7. David Brenneman, museum director, says planning for new spaces and re-conceived galleries has been a main focus of the renovation.

‘Race and Football in America’

In Race and Football in America, Dawn Knight traces the impact that the late Indiana University football hero George Taliaferro had on her and many others, as well as on the game of football and the civil rights movement.

Opera Singer Amanda Biggs Again Gracing World Stage

Growing up, opera singer Amanda Biggs traveled with her family of Pentecostal praise and worship church musicians. When they weren’t on the road, parents, grandparents, and children lived in a one-bedroom trailer in Bridgeport, Illinois. “Food insecurity, money insecurity—we ate government cheese and peanut butter,” Biggs, 41, recalls.

IU Student Film Supports Sexual Assault Survivors

After their film Rolling won one of four Best Picture awards and a Best Performance award at Indiana University’s local Campus Movie Fest 2018, Riley Dismore, 22, and Katherine Crump, 23, headed to the big leagues, taking their 5-minute film to the Cannes Film Festival in France.

It’s Time for Lotus! September 26 to 29

Lotus World Music & Arts Festival is back in Bloomington September 26 to 29 with fan favorites Movits! and Väsen. Other returning acts include Finnish quartet Kardemimmit, hurdy-gurdy player Guilhem Desq, and Canadian folk group Le Vent du Nord.

B’Town Jazz Fest Set for August 31

B’Town Jazz has been bringing jazz to Bloomington since 1999, when trumpeter Pat Harbison; his wife, Kristin; and pianist Monika Herzig formed the nonprofit organization that was then called Jazz from Bloomington.

Enthusiasm Earns Local Women Magical Trip to Broadway Show

When friends Carolyn Anderson, Linda Burton, Sandy Martin, and Suzanne Roberts attended a performance of the musical Ain’t Too Proud: The Life and Times of The Temptations at IU Auditorium last June, they noticed a man seated across the aisle from them who seemed to be eavesdropping on their conversation at intermission.

WFHB’s Live ‘Saturday’s Child’ Celebrates 25 Years on the Air

WFHB-FM’s live monthly music broadcast, Saturday’s Child, aired for the first time in March 1994 from the Rose Firebay at the John Waldron Arts Center. According to host Dan Grundmann, WFHB’s chief engineer Jeff Morris approached him with the idea of airing a live performance at a public venue.

Priscilla Barnes: TV & Film Star Performed Here in Play at BPP

Priscilla Barnes was in Bloomington for several weeks in April and May, performing in the Bloomington Playwrights Project production of the psychological thriller To Quiet the Quiet. The play was directed by David Anspaugh, who also made his acting debut.

At Carnegie Hall: Jill Bolte Taylor’s TED Talk Plays as a Choral Composition

In July 2018, neuroanatomist Jill Bolte Taylor received an unexpected email from Brad and Doug Balliett, the renowned twin orchestral composers. They proposed making Taylor’s life and work the focus of a new choral composition, thus providing perhaps the strangest-ever answer to the age-old question, “How do you get to Carnegie Hall?”

Artist Dixie Ferrer: Inspired by Nature

In her 40-year career, longtime Brown County resident Dixie Ferrer has been a textile and ceramic artist and a painter. She has created quilts, silkscreens, batiks, tiles, oil paintings, water-based-paint collages with homemade papers, drawings, and photographs.

New Visitor Center for Guests at T.C. Steele State Historic Site

Summer visitors to the T.C. Steele State Historic Site will be greeted by a whole new experience. Singing Winds Visitor Center, a 4,600-square-foot structure, is the largest and most noticeable of the changes. It features indoor restrooms, programming space, a gift shop, and a video introduction to the site’s history, among other amenities.

‘Birch Bayh: Making a Difference’

In his new book about Birch Bayh, Indiana’s Democratic U.S. senator from 1963 to 1981, author Bob Blaemire shows his hand up front, writing, “This biography was a labor of love.” And the book couldn’t be more timely. Sadly, Bayh died on March 14 at the age of 91.

Players Pub Lives on in Mural at I Fell Event

While The Players Pub may be closed, a piece of it lives on. The mural that graced the back stage of Bloomington’s iconic music venue will be the centerpiece of a jazz-themed exhibit at the I Fell building during its June 7 First Friday @ the Fell, 415 W. 4th. St.

FAR Center Tango Event Is Dance with Photographs

Part of the stated mission of the FAR Center for Contemporary Arts is to “nurture community within the arts by means of collaboration between diverse art forms and other disciplines.” On May 31 and June 1, “Black + White,” to be held at FAR’s 505 Theater, is an event that puts that aspiration into action.

Jewish Theatre Play Addresses Prejudice From Various Angles

Titled for the burgundy Doc Marten boots worn by its antagonist, the Jewish Theatre of Bloomington’s most recent production, Cherry Docs, tells the story of recently arrested neo-Nazi Mike Downey and his court-appointed Jewish lawyer, Danny Dunkelman.

Sense of Belonging & Community Take Center Stage at Granfalloon

Granfalloon, a convergence of independent music, theater, out-of-the box creative local events, and literary scholarship—all inspired by Indiana author and luminary Kurt Vonnegut—is returning. The second annual event will be held at venues across the city May 9–11.

Jerome Harste: Artist of Many Genres

It wasn’t until he retired from Indiana University that Jerome Harste began creating art for public consumption. The author of scholarly and children’s books and a distinguished professor of literacy, culture, and language, Harste, 77, was IU’s first Martha Lea and Bill Armstrong Chair of Teacher Education. But when he retired in 2006, the teacher became the student.

Local DJ Maddog Hits High Seas with Kesha (Photo Gallery)

Although Madison True has been a professional DJ for just a little more than three years, she’s been spinning 90’s-inspired dance beats since first tinkering with the DJ software FruityLoops while a student at Bloomington High School South.

Musician Travis Puntarelli Is Busy, Busy, Busy, Busy

Flexibility is a running theme in Travis Puntarelli’s life and career. He plays multiple instruments (his website lists everything from guitar and accordion to whistles and ukulele), is restless and widely traveled, and performs eclectic music in diverse venues.

WTIU Celebrates 50 Years of Serving and Entertaining Viewers in Southern Indiana

When it began broadcasting on March 3, 1969, Indiana University television station WTIU had three employees, began its day with the national anthem, and signed off in the evening with the IU alma mater. It was on the air just 29 hours a week.
Fifty years later, WTIU has 80 full-time employees and is on the air 24 hours a day.

Sylvia McNair Back at WFIU Hosting Classical Music Show

When Sylvia McNair began hosting a new program of classical music on WFIU-FM in January, it was a homecoming of sorts. McNair worked at the station in the early 1980s while earning a master’s degree at the Indiana University School of Music.

Artist Karen Holtzclaw: Bright Works Reveal Dark Themes

Wielding vibrant oil paints, artist Karen Holtzclaw conjures creatures who have a lot to tell us about the state of our world. Her newest collection, entitled “Ponderings,” recently exhibited in the Bellevue Gallery at the Farmer House Museum, 529 N. College, is one such example.

The Life of Bob Hammel In a Movie and a Memoir

The subject of the upcoming WTIU and Naptown Media documentary Bob Hammel & Bloomington: A 50-Year Love Affair prefers asking questions to answering them. “I was the guy watching things happen, not the guy doing them,” says Bob Hammel, former sports editor of Bloomington’s daily newspaper, The Herald-Times.

Chad Rabinovitz Looks Back On a Decade Heading BPP

When Chad Rabinovitz became the producing artistic director of Bloomington Playwrights Project (BPP) in 2009, the financially strapped organization was unable to afford even basic upkeep on the building it rented at 107 W. 9th St.

New B-town Resident Is Noted Film Producer

In Tricky Dick and the Man in Black, Richard Nixon invites Johnny Cash to perform at the White House in 1970 and issues a press release stating that Cash will perform Guy Drake’s “Welfare Cadillac” and Merle Haggard’s “Okie from Muskogee,” songs about small-town Americans who don’t wear long hair, use drugs, or burn draft cards. Cash performed neither.

Ivy Tech Student Theater Explores the Evil Among Us

Evil has visited upon the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center. The 2018–19 Ivy Tech Student Productions theater season “explores the eternal question of evil with a wide range of approaches,” says Artistic Director Paul Daily.

Juniper Art Gallery: A New Destination Shop in Spencer

Maybe it’s because she grew up in an artistic home—her father was a painter, her mother, a sculptor— but Jaime Sweany keeps circling back to art as a vocation. Her new enterprise is Juniper Art Gallery in Spencer.

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ARTS/ENTERTAINMENT

‘Spirit of Indiana’: A New Campus Sculpture

From meticulous gardens to architectural gems, Indiana University is known for its picturesque campus. Outdoor statues and sculptures help accentuate that beauty, but IU philanthropist Pat Miller noticed that the artistic touches stopped north of 17th Street as visitors approached the athletics complex.

Pacifica Quartet Wins Another Grammy

At the 2021 Grammy Awards, Indiana University’s quartet-in-residence, The Pacifica Quartet, was awarded Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance for its album Contemporary Voices.

Raymond Fleischmann: B-town’s New Novelist

Raymond Fleischmann, director of advancement communications at the Indiana University College of Arts and Sciences, published his debut novel, How Quickly She Disappears (Berkley Books), in January 2020.

April Strawn: Teen Book Illustrator

Late in the process of publishing The Chill, author Michael Koryta pitched the idea of including pictures in the novel to his editor. And he knew exactly who he wanted to draw them.

Review: ‘The Way of Imagination’

“How can we keep from crying out in wonder and praise?” asks Scott Russell Sanders in one of the alternately exultant and grieving essays contained in his newest collection, The Way of Imagination.

REVIEW: ‘Kitchen Think’

Like Nancy Hiller’s well-crafted cabinetry, her newest book, ‘Kitchen Think’ (Lost Art Press), is both useful and beautiful.

Power Plant Collective Shows Art by Marginalized Artists

In a small basement on Bloomington’s Near West Side, a group of 20-somethings has created a gallery where aspiring artists can gather. It’s a space where they can display their work and showcase talents that might otherwise remain unknown.

Brown County Music Center Brings Big Names to Nashville

After a 2009 arson fire destroyed the Little Nashville Opry, an entertainment venue that had served Brown County for more than 30 years, the community felt the loss. Things took a bright turn when the Brown County Music Center opened in August 2019 to a sold-out Vince Gill concert.

Wylie House Exhibit Portrays Marginalized, Silenced Hoosiers

The written records and visual art we share as historical representations of our collective past depict, more often than not, only one point of view. Those who weren’t in positions of power—who didn’t have a voice—are frequently forgotten or simply overlooked.

‘‘Lock Ness!’ and Other Tales of Nessie the Scottie’

For all the joy they bring, it’s a sad truth that pets’ lives are much shorter than our own. In “Lock Ness!” and Other Tales of Nessie the Scottie (BookLocker, 2019), Bloomington resident and Bloom contributor Lee Ann Sandweiss explores the loss of her own pet and offers a guiding hand for those experiencing similar grief.

Review: ‘Author in Chief’

Just before President’s Day, Bloom caught up with Bloomington resident Craig Fehrman as he set out on a national book tour for ‘Author in Chief’.

King Bee & The Stingers: Blues Band on the Rise

By day, Mark Menefee, 60, is the Indiana University director of utilities. By night, he’s the black- and-yellow-clad harmonica player “King Bee” of the blues band King Bee and The Stingers.

New Cardinal Initiative Works to Increase Diversity of Plays

In an ongoing effort to be more inclusive, welcoming, and representative of the Bloomington community, Cardinal Stage has introduced the Diversity and Inclusion Initiative. The program is part of Cardinal’s five-year plan that was established in 2018.

Bloomington Symphony Orchestra Celebrates 50 Years Making Music

In 1969, when Geoffrey Simon and Tamás Ungár were students at the Indiana University School of Music, they noticed a lack of performance opportunities for musicians in Bloomington and set out to establish a community orchestra. While Simon actively recruited musicians, Ungár managed behind-the-scenes operations. The result was the Bloomington Symphony Orchestra (BSO).

Eskenazi Museum Acquires The Jeffrey Wolin Collection

Photographer Jeffrey Wolin has spent a lifetime capturing the tragedy, grit, and beauty of the human experience, and his photographs are displayed in museums and galleries worldwide. Now, the Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art at Indiana University has acquired Wolin’s archives—and they contain more than just his previously exhibited and published works.

Cardinal Stage Presents ‘The Roommate’: A Comedy About Two Women Over 50

Film and theater roles for women over 50 have traditionally stayed in a narrow lane—one filled with maternal or spinster archetypes. The Roommate, penned by playwright Jen Silverman, is a dark comedy that aims to break that mold. “Older women are often depicted in a way that belies the truth,” says Indianapolis-based actor Constance Macy. “They aren’t the 50-something women I know.”

B-town Music Expo Is Back February 8

The Bloomington Music Expo—part record and music-memorabilia show, part art and music festival— will be held Saturday, February 8, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Monroe Convention Center. The event, now in its second year, came from the mind of Mike McAfee, executive director of Visit Bloomington.

Documentary on IU’s Henry Glassie Premieres at Toronto Film Festival

The documentary film Henry Glassie: Field Work opens with a series of vignettes of Brazilian sculptors creating traditional sacred art. Not until 30 minutes into the film does Glassie, an internationally renowned folklorist and Indiana University professor emeritus, make an appearance.

Local Drummer Is Living the Dream

Local drummer Luke Narey has long been a fan of alternative metal band 10 Years. “I would blast their music while driving to and from [Edgewood] high school, but never would have imagined I’d have a chance to be part of the band one day,” Narey says.

Steve Dawson: An Unlikely Artist

As a mechanical engineering graduate of Purdue University and president of local mechanical contracting and service firm Harrell-Fish Inc., Steve Dawson might seem an unlikely artist.

New Books from IU Press: ‘Pilgrims of Woodstock’

It’s been 50 years since the Woodstock Music & Art Fair brought 400,000 people together on Max Yasgur’s dairy farm in Bethel, New York. A new book from IU Press, Pilgrims of Woodstock, celebrates the festival’s anniversary by gathering previously unpublished photographs along with the reminiscences of audience members.

The Blues Jam Is Back at Port Hole & Bear’s Place

Joel Kohen has been passionate about the Bloomington music scene since his days as an undergraduate at Indiana University, but he went from enthusiast to proprietor when he and his wife, Deana, bought the Port Hole Inn in January 2017.

Salaam Has Found Its ‘Perfect Balance’

Although Salaam has been together a quarter of a century, founder Dena El Saffar says that only recently has the Middle Eastern quartet hit upon a certain balance that had been quietly simmering for nearly a decade. With patience, practice, and the space to make intuitive music, she says the group feels it has achieved the ideal blend of cultural sounds.

Pictura Gallery: A Nonprofit Supporting Arts Education

David and Martha Moore say they do not have time for stuffy, pretentious art spaces. Once, while in Seattle, they visited an art gallery with a plastic model of a massive, red T. rex on display. David recalls his disappointment seeing a “Don’t Touch” sign juxtaposed with several children running around the model, dying to play with it. “Plastic dinosaurs are meant to be played with,” he says. “How do you not touch a huge, plastic dinosaur?”

Krista Detor’s Annual Holiday Show at FAR Center Dec. 13

Once again, Bloomington-based singer-songwriter Krista Detor will be staying close to home for the holidays, performing an annual show to benefit a local nonprofit organization. “It’s my way of giving back to the community and, at this point, it feels like a tradition, although it’s always a little bit different,” says the internationally acclaimed performer.

Check Out a Zine or Learn to Make One at the Public Library

When local nonprofit bookstore Boxcar Books closed in 2017, the Monroe County Public Library (MCPL) was the recipient of more than 300 zines, increasing its collection to nearly 600 of the small-circulation magazines that are typically self-published and frequently photocopied.

IU’s Eskenazi Art Museum Reopening on November 7

After being closed for renovations since May 2017, the Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art at Indiana University will reopen on November 7. David Brenneman, museum director, says planning for new spaces and re-conceived galleries has been a main focus of the renovation.

‘Race and Football in America’

In Race and Football in America, Dawn Knight traces the impact that the late Indiana University football hero George Taliaferro had on her and many others, as well as on the game of football and the civil rights movement.

Opera Singer Amanda Biggs Again Gracing World Stage

Growing up, opera singer Amanda Biggs traveled with her family of Pentecostal praise and worship church musicians. When they weren’t on the road, parents, grandparents, and children lived in a one-bedroom trailer in Bridgeport, Illinois. “Food insecurity, money insecurity—we ate government cheese and peanut butter,” Biggs, 41, recalls.

IU Student Film Supports Sexual Assault Survivors

After their film Rolling won one of four Best Picture awards and a Best Performance award at Indiana University’s local Campus Movie Fest 2018, Riley Dismore, 22, and Katherine Crump, 23, headed to the big leagues, taking their 5-minute film to the Cannes Film Festival in France.

It’s Time for Lotus! September 26 to 29

Lotus World Music & Arts Festival is back in Bloomington September 26 to 29 with fan favorites Movits! and Väsen. Other returning acts include Finnish quartet Kardemimmit, hurdy-gurdy player Guilhem Desq, and Canadian folk group Le Vent du Nord.

B’Town Jazz Fest Set for August 31

B’Town Jazz has been bringing jazz to Bloomington since 1999, when trumpeter Pat Harbison; his wife, Kristin; and pianist Monika Herzig formed the nonprofit organization that was then called Jazz from Bloomington.

Enthusiasm Earns Local Women Magical Trip to Broadway Show

When friends Carolyn Anderson, Linda Burton, Sandy Martin, and Suzanne Roberts attended a performance of the musical Ain’t Too Proud: The Life and Times of The Temptations at IU Auditorium last June, they noticed a man seated across the aisle from them who seemed to be eavesdropping on their conversation at intermission.

WFHB’s Live ‘Saturday’s Child’ Celebrates 25 Years on the Air

WFHB-FM’s live monthly music broadcast, Saturday’s Child, aired for the first time in March 1994 from the Rose Firebay at the John Waldron Arts Center. According to host Dan Grundmann, WFHB’s chief engineer Jeff Morris approached him with the idea of airing a live performance at a public venue.

Priscilla Barnes: TV & Film Star Performed Here in Play at BPP

Priscilla Barnes was in Bloomington for several weeks in April and May, performing in the Bloomington Playwrights Project production of the psychological thriller To Quiet the Quiet. The play was directed by David Anspaugh, who also made his acting debut.

At Carnegie Hall: Jill Bolte Taylor’s TED Talk Plays as a Choral Composition

In July 2018, neuroanatomist Jill Bolte Taylor received an unexpected email from Brad and Doug Balliett, the renowned twin orchestral composers. They proposed making Taylor’s life and work the focus of a new choral composition, thus providing perhaps the strangest-ever answer to the age-old question, “How do you get to Carnegie Hall?”

Artist Dixie Ferrer: Inspired by Nature

In her 40-year career, longtime Brown County resident Dixie Ferrer has been a textile and ceramic artist and a painter. She has created quilts, silkscreens, batiks, tiles, oil paintings, water-based-paint collages with homemade papers, drawings, and photographs.

New Visitor Center for Guests at T.C. Steele State Historic Site

Summer visitors to the T.C. Steele State Historic Site will be greeted by a whole new experience. Singing Winds Visitor Center, a 4,600-square-foot structure, is the largest and most noticeable of the changes. It features indoor restrooms, programming space, a gift shop, and a video introduction to the site’s history, among other amenities.

‘Birch Bayh: Making a Difference’

In his new book about Birch Bayh, Indiana’s Democratic U.S. senator from 1963 to 1981, author Bob Blaemire shows his hand up front, writing, “This biography was a labor of love.” And the book couldn’t be more timely. Sadly, Bayh died on March 14 at the age of 91.

Players Pub Lives on in Mural at I Fell Event

While The Players Pub may be closed, a piece of it lives on. The mural that graced the back stage of Bloomington’s iconic music venue will be the centerpiece of a jazz-themed exhibit at the I Fell building during its June 7 First Friday @ the Fell, 415 W. 4th. St.

FAR Center Tango Event Is Dance with Photographs

Part of the stated mission of the FAR Center for Contemporary Arts is to “nurture community within the arts by means of collaboration between diverse art forms and other disciplines.” On May 31 and June 1, “Black + White,” to be held at FAR’s 505 Theater, is an event that puts that aspiration into action.

Jewish Theatre Play Addresses Prejudice From Various Angles

Titled for the burgundy Doc Marten boots worn by its antagonist, the Jewish Theatre of Bloomington’s most recent production, Cherry Docs, tells the story of recently arrested neo-Nazi Mike Downey and his court-appointed Jewish lawyer, Danny Dunkelman.

Sense of Belonging & Community Take Center Stage at Granfalloon

Granfalloon, a convergence of independent music, theater, out-of-the box creative local events, and literary scholarship—all inspired by Indiana author and luminary Kurt Vonnegut—is returning. The second annual event will be held at venues across the city May 9–11.

Jerome Harste: Artist of Many Genres

It wasn’t until he retired from Indiana University that Jerome Harste began creating art for public consumption. The author of scholarly and children’s books and a distinguished professor of literacy, culture, and language, Harste, 77, was IU’s first Martha Lea and Bill Armstrong Chair of Teacher Education. But when he retired in 2006, the teacher became the student.

Local DJ Maddog Hits High Seas with Kesha (Photo Gallery)

Although Madison True has been a professional DJ for just a little more than three years, she’s been spinning 90’s-inspired dance beats since first tinkering with the DJ software FruityLoops while a student at Bloomington High School South.

Musician Travis Puntarelli Is Busy, Busy, Busy, Busy

Flexibility is a running theme in Travis Puntarelli’s life and career. He plays multiple instruments (his website lists everything from guitar and accordion to whistles and ukulele), is restless and widely traveled, and performs eclectic music in diverse venues.

WTIU Celebrates 50 Years of Serving and Entertaining Viewers in Southern Indiana

When it began broadcasting on March 3, 1969, Indiana University television station WTIU had three employees, began its day with the national anthem, and signed off in the evening with the IU alma mater. It was on the air just 29 hours a week.
Fifty years later, WTIU has 80 full-time employees and is on the air 24 hours a day.

Sylvia McNair Back at WFIU Hosting Classical Music Show

When Sylvia McNair began hosting a new program of classical music on WFIU-FM in January, it was a homecoming of sorts. McNair worked at the station in the early 1980s while earning a master’s degree at the Indiana University School of Music.

Artist Karen Holtzclaw: Bright Works Reveal Dark Themes

Wielding vibrant oil paints, artist Karen Holtzclaw conjures creatures who have a lot to tell us about the state of our world. Her newest collection, entitled “Ponderings,” recently exhibited in the Bellevue Gallery at the Farmer House Museum, 529 N. College, is one such example.

The Life of Bob Hammel In a Movie and a Memoir

The subject of the upcoming WTIU and Naptown Media documentary Bob Hammel & Bloomington: A 50-Year Love Affair prefers asking questions to answering them. “I was the guy watching things happen, not the guy doing them,” says Bob Hammel, former sports editor of Bloomington’s daily newspaper, The Herald-Times.

Chad Rabinovitz Looks Back On a Decade Heading BPP

When Chad Rabinovitz became the producing artistic director of Bloomington Playwrights Project (BPP) in 2009, the financially strapped organization was unable to afford even basic upkeep on the building it rented at 107 W. 9th St.

New B-town Resident Is Noted Film Producer

In Tricky Dick and the Man in Black, Richard Nixon invites Johnny Cash to perform at the White House in 1970 and issues a press release stating that Cash will perform Guy Drake’s “Welfare Cadillac” and Merle Haggard’s “Okie from Muskogee,” songs about small-town Americans who don’t wear long hair, use drugs, or burn draft cards. Cash performed neither.

Ivy Tech Student Theater Explores the Evil Among Us

Evil has visited upon the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center. The 2018–19 Ivy Tech Student Productions theater season “explores the eternal question of evil with a wide range of approaches,” says Artistic Director Paul Daily.

Juniper Art Gallery: A New Destination Shop in Spencer

Maybe it’s because she grew up in an artistic home—her father was a painter, her mother, a sculptor— but Jaime Sweany keeps circling back to art as a vocation. Her new enterprise is Juniper Art Gallery in Spencer.

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